Biodiversity: endemic species at risk in Italy

    Biodiversity in Italy is at risk, with declining habitats and endangered species. Find out in this article some of the endemic species at risk in Italy and how 3Bee's Biodiversity Oasis project can contribute to the creation of Europe's largest ecological corridor.
    Biodiversity: endemic species at risk in Italy

    WE PROTECT BEES

    Biodiversità Italia Appennino

    The situation of biodiversity in Italy

    Located in the heart of the Mediterranean, Italy is one of 34 global biodiversity hotspots, i.e. areas of extraordinary value for biodiversity conservation due to the presence of a high percentage of endemic species. In particular, the Italian peninsula hosts 10% of endemic animal species and 21% of plant species. This exceptional diversity is fuelled by the country's richness and variety of habitats and climates, ranging from the mountain ranges of the Apennines to the fascinating coastlines of the Mediterranean, from the alluvial plains of the Po River to the volcanoes of Sicily. Nevertheless, Italy's biological heritage is now seriously threatened. Intense human pressure is causing the degradation and loss of habitats, compromising the health of all Italian ecosystems. This presents Italy with a crucial challenge: to protect and preserve its priceless biodiversity for future generations.

    Rosalia alpina

    The Alpine Rosalie

    Rosalia alpina (Rosalia alpina) is a blue and grey insect, known for its elongated shape and long antennae, and is native to the mountain forests of central and eastern Europe. In Italy, it is present in all regions except Valle d'Aosta and Sardinia. The species is currently classified as vulnerable, mainly due to the destruction of its natural habitat: the mature beech forests. The felling of older plants and the removal of dead or declining trees have compromised its living environment. Added to this is the threat of the collection of mature specimens for collecting purposes. The Rosalia alpina plays a key role in maintaining the balance of forests, as it feeds on dead wood, thus facilitating its decomposition. Its presence is a sign of mature, well-preserved forests, making it a valuable bio-indicator of the health of these ecosystems.

    Fratino

    Il Fratino (Charadrius alexandrinus)

    The Fratinus (Charadrius alexandrinus) is a small native wadding bird that finds its habitat in wet environments characterised by shallow water and feeds mainly on invertebrates that reside in the mud. This particular habit makes it a frequent figure on the beach areas of Italian beaches. However, despite its adaptability, the Fratino is faced with various threats that endanger its survival. Currently, this species is classified as endangered, due to the constant destruction and alteration of its dune and coastal habitat. This damage is often caused by the use of mechanical means for beach cleaning and the over-exploitation of natural coastal areas for tourism purposes. In addition, during the brooding period, the Kentish kent is subject to human disturbance, resulting from human interference and the presence of dogs left loose on the beach.

    Andrenidae

    The Sicilian Andrena

    Andrena siciliana (Andrena siciliana) is a mining bee endemic to Sicily, which plays a crucial role in the process of pollination. Despite its importance for local biodiversity, the species is at risk of extinction. In fact, it has been classified as critically endangered in the IUCN Red List, mainly due to the destruction of its natural habitat and the use of pesticides. Miner bees dig their nests in the soil, contributing to the formation of the soil and its enrichment with nutrients, so the loss of this bee could have a significant impact on the biodiversity of Sicilian plants.

    api e farfalle declino

    Not only in Italy: the biodiversity alarm is also in Europe

    One in three species of bees, butterflies and hoverflies is in decline, a staggering figure. This means that one third of the species that contribute to the biodiversity of pollination in Europe are seeing their populations decline. This decline could have devastating consequences on ecosystems, as it could disrupt food chains and impair plant reproduction. The picture becomes even more alarming when we consider species threatened with extinction: one-tenth of bee and butterfly species are at risk. These species are on the brink of extinction, and if we do not act now, they could disappear forever.

    3Bee for Biodiversity

    3Bee fits into this context with its Oasis of Biodiversity project. 3Bee's Biodiversity Oases are places where the urban world and nature find a meeting point, areas where flora and native fauna thrive, places certified by traceable impact thanks to technology. These habitats, urban and agroforestry, are created in areas and landscapes of low biodiversity located throughout Italy and European countries. The aim of 3Bee is to create Europe's largest ecological corridor for pollinators. Want to know more? Contact us to start your journey towards biodiversity and contribute concretely to its protection through technology.

    Voices from the Oases - 3Bee

    "Voices from the Oases": 3Bee's playlist for biodiversity

    In the run-up to World Habitat Day 2023, 3Bee is launching "Voices from the Oases", the first and only playlist available on Spotify, which plays for biodiversity conservation by reproducing the unique sounds of pollinators recorded by proprietary Spectrum technology. The project is flanked by a special campaign that 3Bee has realised with the support of Metro 5 Milano: in the Milano Porta Garibaldi and Lotto stations, until 15 October 2023, there will be more than 50 posters entirely dedicated to the pollinator insects, precious guardians of biodiversity. Travellers will be able to immerse themselves in a real musical exhibition dedicated to the theme, symbolising an urgent call to action to protect our fragile ecosystem. The loss of biodiversity in fact, precisely because it is not monitored, is an urgent emergency that needs to be addressed.

    By Elena FraccaroSeptember 11, 2023
    Views333Views
    Share

    Frequently Asked Questions

    Do you have any doubts or other curiosities about this article? Here you will find some insights

    What is the situation of biodiversity in Italy?

    Located in the heart of the Mediterranean, Italy is one of 34 global biodiversity hotspots, i.e. areas of extraordinary value for biodiversity conservation due to the presence of a high percentage of endemic species. In particular, the Italian peninsula hosts 10% of endemic animal species and 21% of plant species. This exceptional diversity is fuelled by the country's richness and variety of habitats and climates, ranging from the Apennine mountain ranges to the fascinating Mediterranean coasts, from the alluvial plains of the Po River to the volcanoes of Sicily. Nevertheless, Italy's biological heritage is now seriously threatened. Intense human pressure is causing the degradation and loss of habitats, compromising the health of all Italian ecosystems. This presents Italy with a crucial challenge: to protect and preserve its priceless biodiversity for future generations.

    What is the Rosalia Alpina?

    Rosalia alpina (Rosalia alpina) is a blue and grey insect, known for its elongated shape and long antennae, and is native to the mountain forests of central and eastern Europe. In Italy, it is present in all regions except Valle d'Aosta and Sardinia. The species is currently classified as vulnerable, mainly due to the destruction of its natural habitat: mature beech forests. The felling of older plants and the removal of dead or declining trees have compromised its living environment. Added to this is the threat of the harvesting of mature specimens for collecting purposes. The Rosalia alpina plays a key role in maintaining the balance of forests, as it feeds on dead wood, thus facilitating its decomposition. Its presence is a sign of mature, well-preserved forests, making it a valuable bio-indicator of the health of these ecosystems.

    What is the Fratino or Charadrius alexandrinus?

    The Kentish Plover (Charadrius alexandrinus) is a small native wading bird that finds its habitat in wet environments characterised by shallow water and feeds mainly on invertebrates that reside in the mud. This particular habit makes it a frequent sight on the foreshore areas of Italian beaches. However, despite its adaptability, the Fratino faces several threats that endanger its survival. Currently, this species is classified as endangered due to the constant destruction and alteration of its dune and coastal habitat. This damage is often caused by the use of mechanical means for beach cleaning and the over-exploitation of natural coastal areas for tourism purposes. Furthermore, during the brooding period, the Fratino is subject to anthropic disturbance, resulting from human interference and the presence of dogs left loose on the beach.

    What is Andrena Siciliana?

    Andrena siciliana (Andrena siciliana) is a mining bee endemic to Sicily, which plays a crucial role in the pollination process. Despite its importance for local biodiversity, the species is at risk of extinction. In fact, it has been classified as critically endangered in the IUCN Red List, mainly due to the destruction of its natural habitat and the use of pesticides. Miner bees dig their nests in the soil, contributing to the formation of the soil and its enrichment with nutrients, so the loss of this bee could have a significant impact on Sicily's plant biodiversity.

    What is the situation of biodiversity in Europe?

    One in three species of bees, butterflies and hoverflies is in decline, a staggering figure. This means that one third of the species that contribute to the biodiversity of pollination in Europe are seeing their populations decline. This decline could have devastating consequences on ecosystems, as it could disrupt food chains and compromise plant reproduction. The picture becomes even more alarming when we consider the species threatened with extinction: a tenth of bee and butterfly species are at risk. These species are on the brink of extinction, and if we do not act now, they could disappear forever.

    Latest articles

    WE PROTECT BEES